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New Releases from Demeter Press

There are a few new releases by Demeter Press! I don't have time to review them, but wanted to at least list them here:

Milk Fever by Lissa Cowan

In 1789, Armande, a wet nurse who is known for the mystical qualities of her breast milk, goes missing. Céleste,a cunning servant girl who Armande once saved from shameand starvation, sets out to find her. A snuffbox found in the snow, the unexpected arrival of a gentleman and the
discovery of the wet nurse’s diary, deepen the mystery. Using Armande’s diary as a map to her secret past, Céleste fights to save her from those plotting to steal the wisdom of her milk.

Milk Fever is a rich and inspired tale set on the eve of the French Revolution—a delicious peek into this age’s history.The story explores the fight for women’s rights and the rise in clandestine literature laying bare sexuality, the nature of love and the magic of books to transform lives.


Chasing Rainbows: Exploring Gender Fluid Parenting Practices

Co-Editors: Fiona Green and May Friedman

The book casts a lens on the messy and convoluted ways that feminist parents approach parenting their children in gender aware and gender fluid ways AND features a chapter by the parents of Storm; the baby that is being raised without being identified as a boy/girl and whose story has generated much media interest.


Fresh Hell by Carellin Brooks

This book isn’t about perfect moments with your infant. It doesn’t dispense sensible advice or proscribe schedules to manage the lawless days and nights of early maternity. Instead, this literary think piece, an Eat, Pray Love for the smarter mommy crowd, seesaws from disaster to delight, horror to grim resignation, much like motherhood itself. An antigen to the anodyne, mother-knows-least tone of such cordially hated tomes asWhat to Expect in the First Year,Fresh Hell answers Dorothy Parker’s question-”What fresh hell is this?”—in exhaustive detail




Disclosure: I am getting a complementary membership to MIRCI and subscription to the journal in return for posting these updates. It is, however, something I would have agreed to do for free because I think their work is so wonderful.

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