Writing at the intersection of motherhood, feminism and my Latinidad

22 October 2016

Clean Air Moms Action

Every year it gets worse. As we move from hot & humid days to cool & crisp air that tiny bit of allergy-induced asthma I have gets worse. My dependency on an inhaler grows.

From past allergy tests, I know most of what I am allergic to is Mother Earth. Her glorious trees and flowers make my life hard and clog up my nasal passages. But I also know from experience that air action days make high pollen days seem like a picnic. What makes me feel worse about those days is that for my health I need to stay in air-conditioned spaces. Even if AC is part of the bigger problem!

That is why I consider the health of our environment is an important issue for me. Despite it not receiving the needed attention during the presidential or vice-presidential debates, our environment is a national issue...even a national security issue!

I really don't understand why such an important issue and one that should be one we can all rally around wasn't truly addressed. I know that Trump has tweeted that climate change is a hoax and that many in the GOP do not believe the science, but even more so why it should be addressed.

That is why when Clean Air Moms Action asked for people to write about why air pollution is an important issue for the upcoming election I said, "HELL YES!" They are traveling the country with a documentary film crew capturing the stories of parents who are fighting daily to protect their children’s health effects of exposure to oil & gas productions, high-tide flood waters, and ground water contamination from coal ash waste sites.

Clean air is an issue that is wrapped up in other issues. Normally we talk about it as a side issue to energy or climate change, but really it should be THE ISSUE. Then we break it down into trade, health care, economy, immigration, etc. Let's flip the conversation! 

No matter who wins the election, we have a lot of work to do to clean up our environment. So make sure you get out there and vote!

Join me in pledging to vote on November 8th (or earlier!)

This post was produced with support from Clean Air Moms Action.
All opinions are, of course, my own

17 October 2016

A GIF recap of Cubs - Dodgers Game 2

The Cubbies lost game two and instead of moping, I bring you my recap of the game in Steven Universe GIFs:

We started the game off with three up, three down. We felt good then, right?


And then the Dodgers hit a homerun. I wasn't going to let it get to me too much:


Joy at the Cubbies solid defense getting us out of a jam:


When Zobrist caught that ball!


More joy after Javy made a genius call to let a hit ball drop so we can get out of an inning:


Trying to will my Cubbies to find their mojo, juju, whatever magic they used to win over 100 games this season:


Mad at the ump and frustrated at our lack of hits:


And then we lost...


Now off to LA and game three. Good luck, Cubbies! Go get 'em!!


16 October 2016

Here’s to Planned Parenthood #100YearsStrong

100 years today Margaret Sanger opened her first birth control clinic in New York. It was soon shut down because 100 years ago birth control was outright illegal. While Sanger is fraught with complications due to her strategy to partner with wealthy eugenicists to bankroll the development of the bitch control pill and other aspects of the birth control movement, her work lead to the founding of Planned Parenthood.

Planned Parenthood is where myself as well as many friends first sought out reproductive healthcare. It is where the protagonist in Judy Blume’s Forever heads to when she decides she is ready to have sex with her high school sweetheart. They have always been a target of conservative forces who wish to reduce women’s access to healthcare. From being painted as abortion mills to targeting communities of color, Planned Parenthood has had to fight for its existence from day one.

As an 18-year-old I was lucky to have plenty of Planned Parenthood clinics to choose from when I needed reproductive healthcare. Alas, too many parts of the USA have only one Planned Parenthood for too wide of geographic area.

Planned Parenthood as a brand is good for the entire reproductive health care movement in terms of knowledge. Being able to be name dropped in a timeless novel is important to young people identifying where they can obtain services without having to ask their parents. On her 13th birthday, our health care provider gave my daughter more privacy on our account. Now she can make her own appointments, but I can’t see how the system can give her total privacy since we do have health insurance and get statements. That said, I am glad that our health care provider gives young people a sense of autonomy. But that is why Planned Parenthood and other clinics are so important – privacy.

After college I volunteered at one of the Planned Parenthood clinics. I checked in patients, filed records, and other things required as the first face people saw. I will never forget a young woman, probably in college, who was frantic about her privacy, “My mom will never know, right? Even if she calls?” That said, I saw young women escorted to the clinic with their mothers as well.

In 100 years, Planned Parenthood has offered the women and men of the USA the opportunity to access confidential healthcare. From birth control, abortions, mammograms, and STI testing, Planned Parenthood has done a lot for us. I’m conflicted on what to wish them for the next 100. Ideally women wouldn’t need a separate healthcare clinic for pregnancy terminations or low-income women need to seek out free mammograms outside of their regular healthcare team. But until we get to that day, long-live Planned Parenthood and their kick ass services.

13 October 2016

The Mystery of Boy's Clothing

While I'm the mom of a girl, I wasn't shy to shop for her in the baby boy's clothing section or later as a toddler. The boy's section has non-glitterized clothing, solid colors, and superheroes. One of my daughter's favorite pajama sets was a Superman one with a cape. You can't find that in the girl's section.

Recently an 8-year-old girl made this discovery and her mom made a video of her disgust. Not only did she realize that boy's clothing has stronger language on them, but girl's clothing has some pretty dumb messages.
Daisy begins her spectacular rant by gesturing at the girl’s shirts. She says, “Well, the girl’s clothes say “hey,” “beautiful,” “I feel fabulous”.” She then points out the shirts in the boy’s section. “The boys — “desert adventure awaits,” “think outside the box,” “hero.””  

And then there are times when boy's clothing have messages that are disgusting and insulting to girls. Forever 21 sold boy's clothing with messages about only dating models before a backlash forced Forever 21 to pull them. In recent years we have seen the GAP market boy's clothing as smart and intellectual, while girl's clothing gets the cute treatment.

The divide between boy's and girl's clothing has become an issue not because of what we print on them, but as we become more open to kids blurring the gender clothing divide. Much is still speculated about Shiloh Jolie-Pitt. Does Shiloh go by John? Is Shiloh transgender? Or does Shiloh just really like to dress up in suits?!

I think too many people see girls wearing suits as a rejection of femininity, but I've seen some deliciously feminine suits for women! In fact, the best suits for girls and women are fit to our bodies. And flip for boys who want a little glitter on their dump trucks. 

I forecast in the near future seeing children's clothing no longer labeled boy's or girl's, but rather we'll sort them by attribute: color, glitter, nature, superheroes, etc. This will allow for a parent to shop for a green tulle skirt to go with the Incredible Hulk tee. Or maybe some cargo shorts to with a sparkling Wonder Woman tee? And who cares which gender is wearing either of those outfits!

“This post is a partnership with Nakturnal."

07 October 2016

EVENT: Fantasy Island For Dummies (too near, too near)

I received information on what looks like a fun show in Chicago. I hope to make it there before it closes. If you get there first, let me know what you think.


The world premiere of

Fantasy Island For Dummies
(too near, too near)

Written by Ruth Margraff
Directed by Kate Hendrickson

Cast: Holly Thomas-Cerney, Casey Chapman, Skye Fort, John Kahara, Lyndsay Rose Kane, Emily Lotspeich, Chris Popio, Bob Wilson

Opens: Thursday, September 29, 2016 at 8PM Saturday
Closes: November 5, 2016 at 8PM

Runs: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays at 8PM

Admission: $20 on Thursdays and Fridays; $25 on Saturdays, Special two-for-one admission on Fridays

Where: TRAP DOOR THEATRE 1655 West Cortland Ave. Chicago, IL 60622

For Information/Reservations: 773-384-0494 To purchase tix online www.trapdoortheatre.com

What: Fantasy Island for Dummies (low cut daydream too near, too near) is a new music-theatre work inspired by an episode of the iconic television series about the pleasures and perils of wish fulfillment. Devised in a collaborative exploration with Trap Door Theater actors, the piece is written by Ruth Margraff and directed by Kate Hendrickson, with original music composed by Pink Velvet. A 1980 “Fantasy Island” episode about a ventriloquist and her devious dummy inspires a voyage into suppressed identities, ancient Babylonian sex goddesses, and a “perfect wife” struggling with her defiant side.

06 October 2016

FLASH GIVEAWAY - Together Conference TONIGHT

Together, an event for women is coming to Chicago at the Rosemont Theatre - TODAY - Thursday 10/6. Created by Jennifer Rudolph Walsh (head of WME’s literary division and the woman behind Arianna Huffington, Sheryl Sandberg and Oprah’s book tours), Together will feature real women sharing their true and vulnerable stories. The amazing women at the helm of Together’s Chicago event include Glennon Doyle Melton, Seane Corn, Valarie Kaur, Chicago native Dr. Jacqui Lewis, and special celebrity guest Sophia Bush.

While most conferences limit space and come with a substantial price tag, Together is inviting thousands of women to attend, with tickets starting as low as $25. Together wants women in Chicago from all generations and backgrounds to come experience this joyous night of storytelling, laughter and community.

BUT....If you can get out to Rosemont TODAY and want to bring a girlfriend or sister, I have TEN pairs of tickets to giveaway by 4 PM.

Just comment with your email address and they are yours!

05 October 2016

Review: Insecure


Issa Rae gained wide recognition through an honest look at life in her YouTube series, “The Misadventures of AWKWARD Black Girl.” This weekend Rae’s HBO series Insecure debuts and you really shouldn't miss it.

Insecure introduces us to Issa Dee as a late-20s single woman in a dead-end relationship and possibly dead-end job. But it is the awkwardness of Issa’s human interactions that are the star of the show. From her half-assed way of breaking up with her utterly unromantic boyfriend to her spectacular fail at a new guy, Issa is living up to the show’s name. Issa's bestie, Molly, who appears to have it all together, doesn't. It's their friendship that will carry this show through the exploration of being modern-day Black women.

The scene that best exhibits the brilliance of Insecure's writing team and the promise of the show is when Issa and her coworkers are brainstorming at the nonprofit. Despite being a nonprofit that works with youth of color Issa is the only visibly person of color on the staff. And the rest of the staff’s view of what will help youth of color will seem all too real for those of us who have been "the only" in a room. I truly believe that if this scene offends you, you have some issues to address. If you get this scene and laugh, you get it. You get why the white savior complex is a real issue and that good intentions are not good enough. You get why it is wrong to serve a population yet have almost no one from that population on your staff.

A photo posted by Veronica (@veronicaeye) on

I was lucky enough to attend the Chicago premiere showing. This means that I got to hear hoots and hollers when the best scenes occurred. This show is funny has hell, people. If you have HBO or HBO Go, make time to watch.

Insecure premieres
Saturday, October 9th
10:30 PM Eastern

The half-hour comedy series Insecure, starring Issa Rae, Yvonne Orji, Jay Ellis and Lisa Joyce, looks at the friendship, experiences and tribulations of two black women. Created and executive produced by Issa Rae, this eight-episode series is also executive produced by Prentice Penny, Melina Matsoukas, Michael Rotenberg, Dave Beck, Jonathan Berry, and Larry Wilmore as a consultant.

Disclaimer: I was invited by HBO to attend the premiere. Outside of apps and a free beer, I received no compensation for this review.

28 September 2016

Amaze-ing and Smart Sex Ed

One of the toughest stops along the parenting journey is talking about sex. A recent study found that teens really don't like it when school-based sex ed is taught by a teacher they will have in the future. They prefer for sex ed professionals to teach them then fade out of their lives. It seems fairly logical if you remember what it was like when you were 12 and your health teacher asked if you had any questions.

The study notes that teens were disappointed in sex ed programs that only focused on heterosexual relationships and said that humor is something they wished was included. Again, you're a 14 learning about sex, a pretty awkward subject even for adults. A little laughter would go a long way at putting you at ease. Also...kids who hear that sex is bad are less likely to plan for sex meaning that they won't use any protection against pregnancy and STIs.

Now most parents I know are supportive of comprehensive sex ed in our children's schools, but we also know that "the talk" doesn't end there.

Amaze is a new site full of funny videos aimed 10-14-year-olds. Most are animations with some great drawings. The information is much more than simple sex ed. The topics covered include sexuality, when one might be ready for sex, and even how to handle it when you and your BFF start to drift apart. 

I think Amaze is a much needed addition to any parents' toolkit. I love how funny, cute and even poignant the videos can be. While I leaned on a book when my daughter was younger, I haven't found a good book to have for her during this middle school period. As a parent you can watch one to get a sense of how to talk to your child about a topic, or maybe watch it, suggest it to your child and then talk about it afterward. Or it might be a site where you can send a strong signal that you trust your child to make good decisions by simply saying, "Hey, I found this new site. I think you should bookmark it for when you have questions about sex and relationships."

Head on over to Amaze and let us know what you think of the videos and the site over social media using the #MoreInfoLessWeird hashtag.

This post is made possible by support from AMAZE. All opinions are my own.

25 September 2016

Parents Guide to the Presidential Debates

Civic-minded parents may be wondering how to handle this year's Presidential debates. In years past, I know I've had homework stop to make my daughter sit and watch debates. Even though she is far too young for voting, at 13 she will be living with the consequences of this election soon enough.

But since this year's election includes a world-class liar, how we do handle this with our children?

1. Before the debate gets going, ask your child(ren) what issues they hope the candidates will talk or be asked about. What issues in the world are the ones they think are important?

And don't let them off the hook if they say, "I dunno, I don't really follow the news." Ask them what in their lives is important and wish the next President would be thinking about. I find that one problem with people engaging in politics is that they really don't know where the hell Aleppo is or what to think about Israel and Palestine. In reality, most of our lives are impacted by politics.

What will Clinton or Trump do for our public school systems?
What will they do to address the lack of access to healthcare for children?
What about homeless children?

Have your kids look around their world, their life and figure out what the President might impact. If they are worried about litter, don't tell them the President isn't responsible for that. Let it slide for now or brainstorm on how to connect it to the President (maybe a commitment to a more sustainable USA?).

2. Grab a notepad and print out the NYTimes list of lies that Trump has told recently

3. Lies: Have your child(ren) keep track if any of the documented lies Trump has said get told again during the debate. If anyone is accused of lying (or you yell LIAR! at the TV), write it down. Then after the debate check in with Politifact, FactCheck, as well as the NYTimes and the Washington Post.

Guess what? You're teaching your kids how to do research online and be conscious political consumers.

4. Sex: Rumors have swirled that Roger Alles would prepare Trump with zingers about President Bill Clinton's extramarital affairs. A few days ago it appeared that Trump had invited Gennifer Flowers to the debate and she accepted over Twitter! Today Mike Pence says it was all a joke. But either way, I would not be surprised if Flowers or Lewinsky is brought up.

For me, my 13-year-old already knows about the Lewinsky affair. I swear it was in a history book! So I explained it years ago. She's also studying Hemingway right now, so one more affair mention is no biggie. That said, if it comes up address it in a manner that you feel comfortable.

5. Laughter: Keep track of these moments too. As Samantha Bee has warned, Alles is really, really good at creating a funny moment in the debate that lets his candidate off the hook from answering. Talk about how that happened, why Holt allowed it to happen, and if the other candidate tried to keep the candidate on topic.

6. Spin: You ever notice how in an interview someone will answer a question with something TOTALLY not what they were asked about? That's spin. They are spinning back to their prepared talking points. Keep track of those too. What does it mean that someone made that move? What was totally unanswered? Again, did Holt allow them to spin away from a question?

It seems like a lot of work to do while watching a debate, but I firmly believe it will help raise the next generation of voters, activists, and thinkers.

I'll most likely be live-tweeting during the event, feel free to join me or let me know how things are going!

One last thing...Momsrising created a debate bingo card too! Go get it.

18 September 2016

Psst...anyone still there?

wow...Almost four months of not posting here. That may be a record, but I'm so busy that I don't have time to actually figure it out. So what's been up with this lack of writing? Well writing other places.

First of all I've been writing over at Bitch Media, mostly, about the election. 
And as you can see, doing a lot of writing about Trump. Hopefully you are following me on Twitter or like this blog at Facebook because that is where I do promote my writing.

I also wrote two pieces about Brock Turner at Mom.me.

I also spent the summer wrapping up my last job working with women in STEM students. I left that job in August and am now focusing on my writing full-time as well as consulting with others, mostly academics and authors, on their social media strategies. 

That means summer went by faster than it I would have liked it, but that's the cookie that life crumbled for me.

On the other hand, I did get a lot of reading done so I have a few book reviews to share with you all soon!

AND...lastly, my daughter turned 13. Who knows what I will feel like I can here or other places about now being the parent of an official teenager. Ugh...the dilemma us parent bloggers face. Share that story so other parents can feel like they aren't the only ones? Or respect our child's privacy?

I hope your summers were awesome and that the school year has started off well. I do have a post about that soon!!

Thanks for reading,

08 June 2016

The Feminist Guide to the 2016 Printers Row LitFest

Feminists are everywhere at the 2016 Printers Row LitFest this weekend!
 Did I miss a feminist event? Leave it in the comments! 

Disclaimer: Not every person at each highlighted event is a feminist. But there is at least one! So go!

04 May 2016

Book Review: Modern Girls by Jennifer S. Brown

Modern Girls by Jennifer S. Brown is a heart-wrenching read that you won't want to put down. Set in NYC just after World War I in the heart of the Jewish immigrant community, we find Rose and Dottie, mother and daughter, both faced with unplanned pregnancies and their long-awaited careers within their grasp.

Full disclosure...Jennifer is a long-time bloggy friend. When she asked if I wanted a copy to review, I jumped at the chance. While I use to read her blog on a regular basis, I was not prepared with her fiction writing to be so gripping. The scene where Rose realizes Dottie is pregnant made me cry on the train.

Modern Girls goes beyond two unplanned pregnancies. It is a story that touches on that tension inherent in immigrant families where the parent wants a child to "do better" than them. Rose proclaims, "A head bookkeeper? Wait until Lana hears about this. She was just bragging about her daughter's new sewing job the other day. Not my daughter! No manual labor for her." Rose also refused to teach Dottie to even sew in an effort to ensure Dottie works with her brain, not with her hands. How many children of immigrants and working class parents have heard that line?

The beauty of the novel comes from how the mother-daughter pair deal with their unplanned pregnancies. Brown beautifully writes their conflicted feelings on how to proceed.
"My life was about to take a sharp turn, and I'd never come down this path again...Before or after. I'd either be a wife with a home and a child or be a career gal with the ghost of what could have been."
Despite the timing of this story and the decisions to be made, sex is never framed as bad. Even Rose spends time reminiscing about her long-lost love. In any other book, someone would feel bad about the sex that resulted in the situation the women find themselves, but Brown eschews any sexual guilt for our protagonists. That decision makes this book a truly feminist read.

I was a bit torn by the end of the novel. In fact I noted a point in the book where I thought would had been a fitting conclusion, but it was not to be. The remainder of the story helps to wrap up a few more plot lines, but when Rose and Dottie walk down the street is where I would have ended this tale.

Modern Girls is an exploration of the mother-daughter bond, the immigrant experience, what it means to be "a modern woman" and a reminder of a time when women's choices were severely limited, but they still tried to find a way to stay true to themselves.

Please purchase your own copy of Modern Girls from Powells or Indiebound and support Viva la Feminista.

29 April 2016

Flashback Friday: The Gender Voting Gap by Kartemquin Films

cartoon of a man talking to a woman. Woman giving side eye.

To celebrate their 50th anniversary, Kartemquin Films is releasing films to download for free! This week the film is from 1984 and "explores the growing difference in the voting patterns of men and women (the gender gap) that could no longer be denied by the mid-1980's. Issues like compensation equality, environmental preservation, subsidized childcare and healthcare became wedge issues in Ronald Reagan's America as more and more women joined the workforce." It is wonderfully illustrated by Nicole Hollander. At the end of the film there is an update on the issues from 2012. It is pretty sad how much the 1984 film is still relevant in 2016, especially considering Donald Trump's "woman card" comments.

You can view the film online below, but if you visit Kartemquin Films you can download the film for free and own it forever!

26 April 2016

Book Review: The Obsession

CW: The plot of this book deals with sexual assault and emotional abuse. Some graphic depictions of assault.

Photo by Viva la Feminista

I have to admit that I read the description of this book when it was pitched to me pretty quickly. I am sure I was pulled in by the "heroic young woman moving past tragedy" framing because it did not really dawn on me that I was asked to review a Nora Roberts book. And I didn't even really know who Roberts was, I mean I knew her name, but I didn't have all the parts of the math equation. Then when I got the book I put it off long enough I had to sprint through the book to get it done even close to my deadline. Suffice to say, this review is from someone who didn't realize she was reading a romance novel until she was done and read the author's Wikipedia entry. So the book...

As I said, I decided to sprint through The Obsession by Nora Roberts to even get close to my deadline. Luckily this book grabs a hold of you so quickly that I would have sprinted through it even if I had started it a year early. The first few chapters document the first 20 or so years of Naomi's life that at one point I was pretty disappointed not to get more into those pivotal years. We go from Naomi learning the awful truth about her deranged father and saving a young woman's life to buying a huge house on Puget Sound, Washington that it was a bit whiplashy. But you soon learn that The Obsession is a roller coaster ride and that was just the opening drop.

I want to stop and give major props to Roberts for her ability to describe the Puget Sound area so vividly. I have family in that area and have spent some time in that area, thus my photo at the top. If there is one area outside of Chicago I would move to in a heartbeat, it would be the Pacific Northwest. Roberts doesn't come out and say exactly where Naomi's house is, but from the small names dropped and description, I knew exactly where it was. I could smell where Naomi would hike to take her photographs. I envied her sunrise view cause I have seen the same views from my godmother's kitchen.

When Naomi moves to Washington, she was finally stopped running from her past as the daughter who caught this century's most notorious serial killer. After having been raised in New York by her gay uncles and enduring the suicide of her emotionally abused mother, Naomi finally settles down in an old bed and breakfast in much need of a rehab. She is making her living as a photographer - half artsy stuff that sells in NY galleries and half stock photos. While she has changed her last name, Naomi is always on high alert for anyone who might discover her real origins. This is in fact one reason she chose a sleepy small town to lay down roots.

Naomi quickly is drawn into this small town's social scene, especially after catching the eye of the town hottie/rocker/mechanic. See...it takes awhile for the romance to show up! You get how it took me awhile to realize I was in for some steamy love scenes. I have to admit that I felt the same as Naomi when Xander showed up. He is brash and overconfident in himself. Ugh, I thought. Then as he worked his way into Naomi's heart, he also did to mine.

When Roberts gets this roller coaster moving through the zero-G loops, you are racing through the pages again. I'm proud of myself for picking up on some of the foreshadowing to figure out a little of the ending. There were certainly times when I was thinking, "No, No..NO!! This is not how this ends up!" But Naomi's past does indeed catch up to her now that she has stopped running.

The actual conclusion of the mystery part of the book was only half-satisfying. But the ride was good enough that I would recommend this book be tossed in your beach bag this summer. It will keep you engaged as you take in some sun, but also a book you could conceivably leave for a few days and pick up without a problem. But....I highly doubt you'll be able to put the down long enough for that to happen.

After I did find out I had read a romance novel, definitely not my usual genre, I did a bit of a search on Nora Roberts. She is listed as a feminist romance novelist. Indeed Naomi does mention feminism in the book. The manner in which the book treats Naomi's mother's abuse is honest and gentle in a very feminist way. In fact, I kinda felt that one conversation could had been ripped from an emotional abuse brochure. I would not be surprised if Roberts gets letters from women who say, "I didn't realize I was in an abusive relationship until I read this book." When Naomi discovers her father's secret life, the family moves in with her mom's gay brother and his husband. Their relationship is treated without much fanfare outside of moments early on where Naomi's mom and uncle have to talk out the contradictions between his marriage and the morals she came to believe under her husband's rule, especially since it is an interracial marriage. Naomi is a strong character who determined to not only support herself, but save herself from her father's sins.

Again, this is an excellent beach book for the upcoming summer. But if you buy it now, I dare you to make it past Memorial Day before you devour this book.

Please purchase your own copy of The Obsession from Powells or Indiebound and support Viva la Feminista.

Disclaimer: I received a review copy from a publicist.  

15 April 2016

EVENT: espnW Comes to Chicago

The pay gap that the US Women's Soccer team plays under has been an issue for decades. The team went on strike in the 1990s. Even as the team was fighting towards their third World Cup the media covered their wage gap. Now the team is fighting for fair pay. But soccer is not the only sport that shortchanges women players. Equal pay is just one topic that should be discussed at an upcoming event in Chicago on women's sports. The inequity of women athlete salaries is often dismissed to the lack of fans who attend games, thus less sponsorship dollars and on and on. But it trickles down to unequal playing conditions in high school too. Hopefully this gathering of women's sports influencers will craft some sort of plan to tackle the inequities of not just salaries, but media attention that often drives fan attention. If I can see developmental league basketball on ESPN, I should be able to see professional softball and basketball.

On April 20th, 2016, espnW will host the first-ever espnW: Women + Sports Chicago event.
Inspired by the renowned espnW: Women + Sports Summit, this one-day event will unite
a powerful group of sports leaders, marketing executives, professional athletes,
and influencers in the women + sports space.

While tickets are $595, if you are a student you can email ESPNw for a discounted rate. 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...